Guess Who Leads the Bribery World?
The USA is the most corrupt country in the world and I have 10,000 posts that point heavily to that fact…

George Wright, hijacker and killer, captured in Portugal after 40 years as fugitive September 28, 2011

A convicted American murderer who escaped from jail in New Jersey and then hijacked a plane to Algeria has been arrested in Portugal after 40 years on the run. George Wright, now 68, was captured after police matched his fingerprint to a resident ID card

Comments (0)

Texas town pulls the plug on police department June 30, 2011

Attention gun-toting Texas natives: if you were looking to go a’looting, your time is now!

City Council members in Alto, Texas, a town of around 1,200, have voted to abolish the city’s police department for at least six months as the community considers if they will be able to afford the force into 2012.

As of June 15, Alto is being run by the Cherokee County sheriff’s office, whose headquarters are around 12 miles north of town. With only two dozen employees on the force there, overseeing security in the city of Alto will be a burden on the 1,000-square-mile stretch of land that the department is already in charge of.

“I’m going to try, but I can’t guarantee you there will always be an officer in the town,” says Sheriff James Campbell to the Wall Street Journal.

The Cherokee County Sheriff’s Department is also the sole enforcer in Wells, Texas, which has a population of around 800. Earlier this year they relieved their only police officer.

Alto Mayor Monty Collins was against the measure, and he says now that the town’s citizens are instructing others to “bolt your doors” and “buy a gun.”

City Council officials in Alto calculate a budget shortfall of around $185,000 for the fiscal year ending on September 30, but note that it costs about $230,000 to run the town’s PD.

“We had to do something drastic,” says Jerry Flowers to WSJ. Flowers is both a councilman and hay farmer in Alto. “The police department, being a non-money-making entity, was the easiest to get rid of while we catch our breath and build up some cash.”

Apparently the council was given the choice of funding the police department or repairing the city-owned natural gas distribution system. With the latter generating most of the city’s revenue, it was an easy decision for lawmakers.

Charles Barron, however, feels otherwise. As Alto police chief, Barron says that the per-capita crime rate in 2010 exceeded the statewide level. The city was subjected to 66 reported crimes that year, including two dozen burglaries and 39 larcenies.

An antiquated printing press used by an Alto newspaper has been moved to a nearby museum in the meantime to protect it from looters.

Comments (0)

NM Blaze Threatening Nuclear Lab, Sparking Fires June 29, 2011

LOS ALAMOS, N.M. — Firefighters worked through the night hoping to put out spot fires erupting ahead of a wildfire in the mountains above the northern New Mexico town that is home to a government nuclear laboratory.

“That’s the biggest threat we have right now to homes in the community,” Deputy Los Alamos County Fire Chief Mike Thompson said late Monday of the fires that left hillsides above the town of Los Alamos glowing.

The ominous orange was visible at night from deserted Trinity Drive in Los Alamos, from which 12,500 residents were evacuated. The evacuation was so calm and orderly that there wasn’t even a traffic accident, Police Chief Wayne Torpy said.

A crew that had been working at the Arizona wildfires took over efforts at the New Mexico fire Monday, about 18 hours after the blaze started. It has quickly grown to 44,000 acres — or 68 square miles — and ignited a spot fire on lab property.

Another firefighting team was expected to arrive Tuesday because of the potential for the blaze to more than double in size.

The wildfire has destroyed 30 structures south and west of Los Alamos. It forced the closure of the lab and, for many, stirred memories of a devastating blaze in May 2000 that destroyed hundreds of homes and buildings in town.

Laboratory officials said the wildfire sparked a spot fire on its property that was soon contained Monday, and no contamination was released. They also assured that radioactive materials stored in spots on the sprawling lab were safe.

Flames were just across the road from the southern edge of the famed lab, where scientists developed the first atomic bomb during World War II. The facility cut natural gas to some areas overnight as a precaution.

Thompson said containment lines created by firefighters have held despite strong wind.

“We’re pretty confident on that front,” he said. “We’ll pre-treat with foam if necessary, but we really want the buildings to stand on their own for the most part. That is exactly how they’ve been designed. Especially the ones holding anything that is of high value or high risk, for the community, and really, for the rest New Mexico for that matter.”

The spot fire scorched a section known as Tech Area 49, which was used in the early 1960s for a series of underground tests with high explosives and radioactive materials.

The anti-nuclear watchdog group Concerned Citizens for Nuclear Safety said the fire appeared to be about 3.5 miles from a dumpsite where as many as 30,000 55-gallon drums of plutonium-contaminated waste were stored in fabric tents above ground. The group said the drums were awaiting transport to a dump site in southern New Mexico.

Lab officials at first declined to confirm that such drums were on the property, but in a statement early Tuesday, lab spokeswoman Lisa Rosendorf said such drums are stored in a section of the complex known as Area G. She said the drums contain cleanup from Cold War-era waste that the lab sends away in weekly shipments to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant.

She said the drums were on a paved area with few trees nearby and would be safe even if a fire reached the storage area. Officials have said it is miles from the flames.

“These drums are designed to a safety standard that would withstand a wildland fire worse than this one,” Rosendorf said.

Lab spokesman Kevin Roark said environmental specialists were monitoring air quality, but that the main concern was smoke.

The lab, which employs about 15,000 people, covers more than 36 square miles and includes about 2,000 buildings at nearly four dozen sites. They include research facilities, as well as waste disposal sites. Some facilities, including the administration building, are in the community of Los Alamos, while others are several miles away from the town.

Many in the area said the current blaze reminded them of the 2000 fire that blackened about 73 square miles and destroyed hundreds of homes and buildings in the western part of the town.

“It took out all the trees and all of the greenery, and it’s just now starting to come back,” said Terry Langham, a retired lab technician whose house survived the 2000 fire. “Now, it’s going to get burned again.”

He said that wildfire in 2000 left a “burn scar” that will likely push the current blaze “a little more rapidly through the area.”

The 2000 fire prompted the lab and residents to cut down trees and take other fire-prevention measures, and firefighters were hopeful that would help.

“Well, you never are safe when you have such a dry situation and you have fuel load and you have vicious winds like this,” said Sen. Tom Udall, D-N.M., who visited evacuees at the Santa Claran Hotel Casino in Espanola. “When you combine all of those together, (it’s) very explosive.”

© Copyright 2011 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Comments (0)

Wisc. Supreme Court Fight Gets Physical June 28, 2011

A fight between Wisconsin’s divided Supreme Court justices led Monday to a criminal investigation and calls from the governor and others to resolve longstanding differences and restore public confidence in the institution.

Liberal Justice Ann Walsh Bradley told the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel that conservative Justice David Prosser tried to choke her during an argument in her state Capitol office on June 13, the day before the court handed down a decision upholding a new law that eliminates most public employees’ collective bargaining rights. Prosser has denied the allegations.

Dane County Sheriff David Mahoney said his office has opened an investigation into the incident at the request of Capitol Police Chief Charles Tubbs, whose agency had original jurisdiction because the argument allegedly took place in the Capitol building.

Tubbs said in a statement he asked the sheriff to handle the matter after consulting with members of the court. He didn’t elaborate and a spokeswoman for the agency that oversees the Capitol Police didn’t immediately respond to a message.

The state judicial commission, which oversees judicial conduct, announced Monday afternoon that it opened a probe on Friday. The commission could ultimately make a discipline recommendation to the Supreme Court, potentially putting the justices in a position to rule on the fate of one of their colleagues.

Gov. Scott Walker, who pushed the union law as a means of saving money, said the justices must end their long-standing divisions for the sake of public confidence in the court.

Howard Schweber, a University of Wisconsin-Madison political science and law professor, said the tensions between the justices reflect a more partisan atmosphere on the court. Large injections of special interest money into the justices’ campaigns have turned the court into a political battleground, he said.

The latest incident has turned the court into a “laughingstock” and reduced a once-respected institution into fodder for late-night comedy shows, Schweber said.

© Copyright 2011 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Comments (0)

NYC Pride Parade Celebrates Passage of Gay Marriage June 27, 2011

NEW YORK — One of the world’s oldest and largest gay pride parades turned into a carnival-like celebration of same-sex marriage Sunday as hundreds of thousands of revelers rejoiced at New York’s new law giving gay couples the same marital rights as everyone else.

This year, the revelry was likely to go beyond floats, music and dancing. For the first time, it could include surprise engagements.

Throngs of cheering supporters greeted Gov. Andrew Cuomo as he led off the parade two days after signing the historic bill that made New York the sixth state to extend full marriage rights to gay couples.

“New York has sent a message to the nation,” Cuomo said before the march down Fifth Avenue. “It is time for marriage equality.”

Revelers hoisted signs that said “Thank you, Gov. Cuomo” and “Promise kept.”

A half-million people were expected to participate.

Cuomo marched with his girlfriend, Food Network personality Sandra Lee, and openly gay elected officials, including New York City Council Speaker Christine Quinn.

The crowd, a dozen deep behind police barricades, whooped and screamed as hundreds of motorcycles roared down the avenue.

“I’m really, really proud of New York,” said Hannah Thielmann, a student at Fordham University in the Bronx who attended with her girlfriend, Christine Careaga.

The couple, both 20, were dressed as brides.

Careaga said her mother called her crying tears of joy after the New York Senate voted on the measure Friday.

“Every mother wants her child to be happily married,” Careaga said.

State Sen. Tom Duane, a Manhattan Democrat who is gay, planned to join in the festivities.

“I always love the parade,” Duane said. “It’s like Christmas and New Year’s all wrapped into one.” This year, he said, the occasion would be “particularly joyous.”

Duane said he and his partner first discussed marriage when Massachusetts became the first state to legalize same-sex marriage in 2004 but opted not to make any decisions until it became legal in New York. They have not made any plans yet.

“That will be next week’s project,” Duane said.

In Chicago, organizers of that city’s parade scrambled to repair dozens of floats after someone slashed their tires overnight at a garage on the South Side.

Parade coordinator Richard Pfeiffer said as many as 50 of the approximately 75 floats had damaged tires. The parade was to go ahead as planned, though some of the 250 entries might be out of order.

“Whoever decided to do this is not going to affect the parade,” Pfeiffer said. “We’re all going to be out celebrating. We’re still going to go on.”

Police spokesman Mike Sullivan said it was too early to determine if the damage was a hate crime.

In New York, the parade stepped off just after noon at 36th Street and Fifth Avenue and headed downtown. It ends at Greenwich and Christopher streets, near the site where gays rebelled against authorities and repressive laws outside the Stonewall Inn in Greenwich Village on June 28, 1969 — an event that gave rise to the gay rights movement.

A year later, several hundred people marched through the neighborhood to commemorate the riots in what is commonly considered the world’s first gay pride parade.

This year’s grand marshals include author and sex columnist Dan Savage and his husband, Terry Miller, who married in Canada; the Rev. Pat Bumgardner, senior pastor of Metroplitan Community Church of New York and a proponent of gay rights; and the Imperial Court of New York, which raises money for gay health and social services.

The law signed by Cuomo takes effect in 30 days. It was passed amid opposition from influential religious groups in the state.

© Copyright 2011 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Comments (0)

New York’s Gay Marriage Law Sparks Love, Rush to Altar

Although June is the traditional month for nuptials, the end of July is expected to see a rush to the altar in New York as gay couples celebrate the legalization of same-sex marriages in the Empire State.

Wedding plans are blooming, now that New York has become the sixth state to legalize same-sex marriage. Couples who had talked about going out of state to wed changed their plans. Wedding planners anticipate picking up business. And churches that accept gay unions say they’re looking forward to hosting ceremonies.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo signed same-sex marriage into law late Friday, shortly after the Senate approved the measure for the nation’s third most-populous state, with 19.4 million residents.

New York joined Iowa, Vermont, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, and Connecticut as states that issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples. New York and Maryland recognize such marriages from other jurisdictions.

The Empire State’s new law will take effect in 30 days.

The Rev. Joseph Tolton, a minister at the Rehoboth Temple Christ Conscious Church in Harlem, said Saturday that he expects to be busy performing ceremonies after the law takes effect next month. The Pentecostal church has a large gay congregation.


Waves of gay couples rushed Saturday to make wedding plans, and the annual NYC Pride March in New York City today is expected to seem like an enormous roving engagement party.

“We expect an extra 500,000 to 1 million as a result of passage,” said Britton Hogge, media director for Heritage of Pride, which organizes the event. Police usually estimate the crowd at about 1.5 million people, he said.

On Saturday, engagement rings were offered and accepted, and champagne corks popped to kick off wedding plans that are likely to add an estimated $284 million to the state’s economy, according to a report from the Independent Democratic Conference.

More than 21,000 gay and lesbian couples from New York are expected to marry within the first three years and nearly 42,000 gay and lesbian couples from out of state will travel to New York for a “destination wedding,” the report said.

“Peter, will you marry me?” asked Dan Gallagher, 46, who dropped down on one knee as he finished running through Central Park on Saturday with his partner of 14 years, Peter Shearer, an emergency medicine physician. The couple, who are raising a 4-year-old son, are thrilled to marry in their home state.

Tim Ford, 45, an actor engaged to marry his partner of 18 years, Michael Beltran, 44, an administrator for a law firm, in October, said, “It makes you feel like we’re equal, that we can celebrate with friends in New York and not have it be, in some people’s eyes, not recognized.
“The wedding planning stress is already started,” he said.

Before the ink dried on the newly signed law, they changed their Facebook status from domestic partnership to engaged, sparking a flurry of congratulations, Beltran said.

“We waited for this day for a long time. It’s very emotional,” he said, choking back tears.
Both men were raised Catholic, and Beltran serves as a group song leader at weekly Mass, but they reluctantly will not be married in the Catholic Church, which opposed the gay marriage bill. The new law exempts churches and religious institutions from having to perform gay marriages.

“It doesn’t bother me, but it bothers Michael a little more,” said Ford, who plans instead to be married by a friend who is an ordained a minister.

Seemingly instantaneous engagements, planned for years but long awaiting the state’s consent, were celebrated around the state, including in the state capital Albany where the proposed law was mired for days in a fight over the exemptions.
“I feel like a first-class citizen, a first-class New Yorker, for the first time in my life,” said Jim Reda of Brooklyn, outside the Senate chamber with his partner of eight years. “We will be married by the end of the year. I can’t believe I’m actually saying that.”

© Newsmax. All rights reserved.

Comments (0)

Wisconsin Justice Says Reports of Clash False

MADISON, Wis. — A Wisconsin Supreme Court justice says reports that he placed his hands around a fellow justice’s neck during an argument in her office are false.

Justice David Prosser told the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel that the allegations involving him and Justice Ann Walsh Bradley “will be proven false” once a “proper review of the matter and the facts surrounding it are made clear.”

Wisconsin Public Radio and the Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism, quoting anonymous sources, reported Saturday that the alleged altercation occurred before the Supreme Court’s decision earlier this month upholding Gov. Scott Walker’s bill to cut public employees’ collective bargaining rights.

Messages that The Associated Press left with several of the justices and Capitol Police Chief Charles Tubbs were not returned Saturday.

© Copyright 2011 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Comments (0)

Pa. Man Found Guilty of Killing 3 Pittsburgh Cops

PITTSBURGH — A jury found a Pennsylvania man guilty in the 2009 killings of three Pittsburgh police officers who responded to his mother’s 911 call about an escalating argument.

The jury deliberating for just over three hours Saturday before returning the verdict against 24-year-old Richard Poplawski. He was found guilty of all 28 counts he faced.

Poplawski was found guilty of first-degree murder in all three killings, the three most serious charges he faced.

The trial now enters a penalty phase in which the jury will hear evidence about his mental state, background and other factors before determining if he gets the death penalty or life in prison without parole.

© Copyright 2011 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Comments (0)

‘Whitey’ Bulger, Accused Mobster, Seeks Court-Appointed Lawyer June 26, 2011

James “Whitey” Bulger, the accused Boston mobster arrested in California with $800,000, was given three days to show why a lawyer should be appointed to represent him at taxpayer expense.

Bulger, 81, and his girlfriend, Catherine Greig, 60, made initial appearances in federal court in Boston Friday after a trip from California. Bulger, who was a fugitive for 16 years, didn’t oppose his continued detention while awaiting arraignment. Wearing jeans and a white hooded sweatshirt, he was led out of the courtroom in handcuffs by U.S. marshals.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Brian Kelly said prosecutors oppose any kind of taxpayer-funded attorney for Bulger, saying he has “family resources available.” Bulger was asked by Magistrate Judge Marianne Bowler if he could afford an attorney.

“Not after you took my money,” Bulger responded. More than $800,000 in cash and more than 30 firearms, along with false identification, were found in Bulger’s apartment after his arrest, the Federal Bureau of Investigation said.

“We think he has more access to cash,” Kelly said. “We clearly don’t think this was his last stash.”

The government seized all of Bulger’s assets, said Peter Krupp, a lawyer appointed to provisionally represent him. Bowler gave Krupp until the close of business on June 27 to make any filings regarding the appointment of lawyers to represent Bulger. She gave Bulger the same deadline to file a financial affidavit.

Bulger is described in a 111-page indictment dated May 23, 2001, as a leader of a criminal organization known as the “Bulger Group” and “Winter Hill Gang.”

The gangs committed extortion, loan sharking, bookmaking, narcotics trafficking and murder, beginning about 1972, the government said. Bulger was wanted in connection with 19 murders.

Bulger may face life in prison or the death penalty if he is convicted of murder, depending on the jurisdiction, Carmen M. Ortiz, the U.S. attorney for Massachusetts, said.

Greig, who fled with Bulger in 1995, was charged in an April 1997 complaint in federal court in Boston with harboring and concealing him from arrest. If convicted, she may face a five-year prison term.

After appearing yesterday before U.S. Magistrate Judge Jennifer Boal, Greig was returned to the custody of U.S. Marshals. She is scheduled to return to court June 28 for a hearing on bail.

Entering the courtroom, Bulger mouthed the word “hello” to his brother William, who was seated in the second row. Greig’s twin sister, Margaret McCusker, also attended the court appearances.

William Bulger served as president of the Massachusetts Senate from 1978 to 1996 and later became president of the University of Massachusetts. While president of the university, he appeared before a U.S. House committee and refused to answer questions about his brother’s whereabouts, citing his Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination.

Bulger and Greig were arrested June 22 in Santa Monica, California, after FBI agents and Los Angeles police put an apartment building under surveillance and lured Bulger outside with an undisclosed ruse, said FBI agent Richard DesLauriers.

The arrests came as the result of a tip received the day before generated as the result of an ad campaign about Greig. The ads ran in 14 cities starting this week and targeted women who were the same age as Greig and might have been her co- worker, hair-stylist or neighbor.

The tip was received by the FBI’s Los Angeles office. While the ads didn’t run in Los Angeles, news coverage of the campaign aired in that market on national news and cable outlets, DesLauriers said.

FBI Informants

U.S. District Judge Mark L. Wolf was assigned to preside over Bulger’s case. It was in Wolf’s courtroom in 1998 that Bulger’s partner, Stephen Flemmi, revealed that he and Bulger were FBI informants and had been promised immunity from prosecution.

Bulger’s group was also linked to illegally shipping arms to the Irish Republican Army and importing about 36 tons of marijuana into the U.S., both in 1984, prosecutors said.

In the 1980s and early 1990s, Bulger worked as an informant on mob activities for the FBI in Boston, according to the agency. He was indicted in January 1995 for racketeering violations, including activities while he was an informant. Five years later he was indicted for multiple murders.

Bulger, who was born in Boston, has a violent temper and was known to frequent libraries and historic sites, the FBI said. He carried a knife and kept physically fit by walking on the beach, the agency said.

Another girlfriend of Bulger’s cooperated with the government in trying to track down the fugitive in 1996, according to a 1997 FBI affidavit in support of the criminal complaint against Greig. The woman, who told the FBI she had been Bulger’s girlfriend for 20 years, found out in 1994 that he had been involved with Greig as well during that time.

The former girlfriend told the FBI in 1996 that, after Bulger was charged in January of 1995, he returned to Massachusetts and picked up Greig, according to the affidavit.

In 2008, the FBI doubled its $1 million reward for information leading to Bulger’s capture. Officials said the disposition of the reward — and a $100,000 reward for Greig — is undetermined.

DesLauriers, the special agent in charge of the FBI’s Boston division, said speculation that the bureau knew of Bulger’s whereabouts before this week’s advertising campaign was wrong.

“Any claim that the FBI knew Mr. Bulger’s whereabouts prior to the FBI’s publicity efforts this week are completely unfounded,” DesLauriers said in a statement posted on the website of the FBI’s Boston division. “When we learned his location, he was arrested promptly.”

The case is U.S. v. Bulger, 94-cr-10287, U.S. District Court, District of Massachusetts (Boston.)

© Copyright 2011 Bloomberg News. All rights reserved.

Comments (0)

Accused Boston Crime Boss ‘Whitey’ Bulger Arrested June 24, 2011

Former mob boss James “Whitey” Bulger, captured near his coastal California hideout after 16 years on the run, was ordered held without bond Thursday for transfer back to Boston to face charges of murder, extortion and conspiracy.

Bulger, 81, one of America’s most wanted fugitives, was lured from his Santa Monica, California, apartment just blocks from the Pacific Wednesday evening by federal agents and police acting on a tip from the public.

The man who inspired the gangster character played by Jack Nicholson in the 2006 film “The Departed” put up no resistance when he and his longtime companion, Catherine Greig, 60, were arrested, federal officials said at a Boston news conference. Greig had been with him in hiding since 1995.

An employee for the company that manages the apartment building, Joshua Bond, told Reuters the couple had lived there for 15 years and went by the names Charles and Carol Gasko. Neighbors said had frequently seen pair out walking together.

The pair appeared Thursday afternoon before a U.S. magistrate judge in Los Angeles, who ordered both of them to remain in federal custody without bail.

Handcuffed but looking calm and fit, Bulger gave short answers to procedural questions posed by the judge. He was mostly bald and wore a neatly trimmed white beard and wire-rimmed glasses.

He smiled and chuckled to himself while staring at reporters in the courtroom before the proceedings began.

When the judge asked if he had read the indictment against him, Bulger held up a sheaf of white papers and replied, “I got ‘em all right here. It will take me quite a while to finish these.” He said “thank you” to the judge at the end.

Greig, with close-cropped white hair, appeared frailer and older than Bulger. She scowled through much of her hearing.

Bulger and Greig waived rights to challenge their removal from California to Boston. The judge said both would be “sent forthwith” back to Massachusetts.

Steven Martinez, assistant director of the FBI Los Angeles office, later said the pair were spending the night locked up in Los Angeles, and that U.S. marshals would escort them across the country as early as Friday.

Bulger, a onetime underworld informant and former leader of the Irish-American criminal group the Winter Hill Gang, was wanted on 19 counts of murder committed in the 1970s and 1980s, and on charges of drug dealing, extortion, money laundering and conspiracy.

Greig was charged in 1997 with harboring a fugitive.

Boston U.S. Attorney Carmen Ortiz said Bulger faced life in prison if convicted.

Bulger fled Boston in late 1994 and was joined by Greig a few months later. Before their arrest, the last credible sighting of the pair was in London in 2002. Bulger was thought to have traveled extensively in the United States, Europe, Canada and Latin America after slipping away.

His story inspired Martin Scorsese’s Oscar-winning film “The Departed” about double-dealing gangsters and corrupt cops in Boston.

 

BEACHSIDE HIDEOUT

Inside Bulger’s Santa Monica hideout, agents said they found $800,000, more than 30 firearms, knives and pieces of false identification. They declined to give details of the ploy that led to Bulger leaving his apartment.

A new series of televised public service announcements aimed at female viewers who might have seen Greig was launched just Tuesday, airing in 14 cities during daytime TV programs — though not in Los Angeles. The FBI also placed billboards in New York’s Times Square and elsewhere.

FBI Special Agent in Charge Richard DesLauriers said the media campaign paid off with an anonymous tip that directly led the critical break in the case.

Agents from the FBI and the Los Angeles Police Department staked out the three-story apartment building Wednesday afternoon before making the arrests.

Bulger is the older brother of William “Billy” Bulger, a former president of the Massachusetts State Senate. William Bulger had no comment about his brother’s arrest.

He was placed on the FBI’s Ten Most Wanted Fugitives list in 1999, and a $2 million reward was offered for information leading to Bulger’s arrest. The FBI doubled the reward offered for Greig’s whereabouts this week, to $100,000.

Bulger, said to be an avid reader and history buff who likes to take long walks on beaches, has been featured on the television show “America’s Most Wanted” more than a dozen times from 1995 to 2010. (Additional reporting by Lauren Keiper in Boston, Jeremy Pelofsky in Washington and R.T. Watson and Alex Dobuzinskis in Los Angeles; Editing by Steve Gorman and Eric Walsh)

© 2011 Thomson/Reuters. All rights reserved.

Comments (0)

Hackers Break into Arizona Police Computers

* Arizona DPS confirms “computer issues”

* Group says it hacked computer to protest immigration law

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Computer hackers who
previously broke into a U.S. Senate server and brought down the
CIA web site struck an Arizona police web site on Thursday.

Lulz Security, saying it opposed a tough anti-immigration
law in Arizona, said it was releasing documents that related to
border control and other law enforcement activities. Its
headline was “Chinga La Migra,” Spanish for a more profane way
of saying “Screw Immigration.”

It released contact information for several people. Reuters
was able to reach two of them to establish that they were
accurate.

“We are aware of computer issues,” said Steve Harrison, a
spokesman for the Arizona Department of Public Safety, “We’re
looking into it. And of course we’re taking additional security
safeguards.”

The Mexico border state passed a law last year ordering
police to check the immigration status of anyone suspected to
be in the United States illegally, in a bid to curb illegal
immigration and border-related crime.

A majority of Americans supported the measure, but outraged
opponents charged it was unconstitutional and would lead to the
harassment of Hispanic-Americans, and called for an economic
boycott of the desert state.

The most controversial parts of the law were blocked by a
federal judge shortly before it came into effect last July,
although Arizona is pursuing an appeal.

FEW ARRESTS

Lulz, a group of rogue hackers who have not been
identified, posts the results of its hacks on Twitter, the
microblogging site where the group has cultivated more than
240,000 followers.

So far LulzSec’s publicized assaults on Sony Corp., the
CIA, News Corp’s Fox TV and other targets have mostly resulted
in temporary disruptions of some websites and the release of
user credentials.

There have been few arrests in the hacks. British police
said Tuesday that they had arrested a 19-year-old man on
suspicion that he was connected to attacks on Sony, the CIA and
a British police unit that fights organized crime.

Spanish police earlier this month apprehended three men on
suspicion they helped Anonymous, a second rogue hacking group
that has teamed up with LulzSec.

Hacker attacks forced Brazil to shut down its presidential
website and other government sites temporarily Thursday, a
day after cyber attacks briefly disabled other government
sites.

LulzSec, whose hacks started to hit headlines last month,
has published the email addresses and passwords of thousands of
alleged subscribers to porn sites, it temporarily took down the
public website of the CIA, and it published data from internal
servers of the U.S. Senate.

Security experts who have researched LulzSec’s origins say
it emerged from Anonymous, which became famous for attacking
the companies and institutions that oppose WikiLeaks and its
founder, Julian Assange. Anonymous also attacked Sony and
governments around the globe that it considered oppressive.

LulzSec’s members are believed to be scattered around the
world, collaborating via secret Internet chat rooms. Suspected
leaders include hackers with the handles Kayla, Sabu and
Topiary, security experts say.

The group’s name is a combination of lulz, which is slang
for laughs, and sec, which stands for security.

(Additional reporting by Tim Gaynor in Phoenix and Roberto
Samora in Sao Paulo)

(Reporting by Diane Bartz and Jim Finkle; Editing by Paul
Simao)

© 2011 Thomson/Reuters. All rights reserved.

Comments (0)

Marine Charged With Firing Shots June 23, 2011

A 22-year-old Marine reservist has been charged with firing shots at military buildings in the Washington, D.C., area last fall. Federal officials reveal in court papers that he videotaped himself shouting “Allah Akbar” after shooting at the U.S. Marine Corps museum, The Washington Post reported.

Yonathan Melaku was arrested last week at the Arlington National Cemetery. He was carrying a backpack with bags of ammonium nitrate, a material that can be used to make a bomb, and a note book with Osama bin Laden, the Post reported.

Court papers allege that between Oct. 16 and Nov. 2 Melaku fired shots at five military sites including into the windows of the National Museum of the Marine Corps and the Pentagon. Melaku joined the reserves in 2007 and has not been deployed overseas. He was found at Fort Myer in the early morning hours last week and when approached by base police fled, dropping his backpack. He was later picked up in the Arlington National Cemetery, the Post reported.

A search of his home turned up a video that showed him driving by the Marine Corps Museum and firing repeatedly out of the passenger window. “Alright next time this video turns on, I will be shooting,” Melaku said on the video, according to the Post. “That’s what they get. That’s my target. That’s the military building. It’s going to be attacked.”
The search also found a list of materials that “are consistent with the requirements for a time power unit and firing mechanism of an Improvised Explosive Device,” the complaint states, according to the Post.

© Newsmax. All rights reserved.

Comments (0)

Census Shows Whites Lose US Majority Among Babies

WASHINGTON (AP) — For the first time, minorities make up a majority of babies in the U.S., part of a sweeping race change and growing age divide between mostly white, older Americans and predominantly minority youths that could reshape government policies.

Preliminary census estimates also show the share of African-American households headed by women — made up of mostly single mothers — now exceeds African-American households with married couples, a sign of declining U.S. marriages overall but also continuing challenges for black youths without involved fathers.

The findings, based on the latest government data, offer a preview of final 2010 census results being released this summer that provide detailed breakdowns by age, race, and householder relationships such as same-sex couples.

Demographers say the numbers provide the clearest confirmation yet of a changing social order, one in which racial and ethnic minorities will become the U.S. majority by midcentury.

“We’re moving toward an acknowledgment that we’re living in a different world than the 1950s, where married or two-parent heterosexual couples are now no longer the norm for a lot of kids, especially kids of color,” said Laura Speer, coordinator of the Kids Count project for the Baltimore-based Annie E. Casey Foundation.

“It’s clear the younger generation is very demographically different from the elderly, something to keep in mind as politics plays out on how programs for the elderly get supported,” she said. “It’s critical that children are able to grow to compete internationally and keep state economies rolling.”

Currently, non-Hispanic whites make up just under half of all children 3 years old, which is the youngest age group shown in the Census Bureau’s October 2009 annual survey, its most recent. In 1990, more than 60 percent of children in that age group were white.

William H. Frey, a demographer at the Brookings Institution who analyzed the data, said figures in the 2009 survey can sometimes be inexact compared with the 2010 census, which queries the entire nation. But he said when factoring in the 2010 data released so far, minorities outnumber whites among babies under age 2.

The preliminary figures are based on an analysis of the Current Population Survey as well as the 2009 American Community Survey, which sampled 3 million U.S. households to determine that whites made up 51 percent of babies younger than 2. After taking into account a larger-than-expected jump in the minority child population in the 2010 census, the share of white babies falls below 50 percent.

Twelve states and the District of Columbia now have white populations below 50 percent among children under age 5 — Hawaii, California, New Mexico, Texas, Arizona, Nevada, Florida, Maryland, Georgia, New Jersey, New York and Mississippi. That’s up from six states and the District of Columbia in 2000.

At current growth rates, seven more states could flip to “minority-majority” status among small children in the next decade: Illinois, North Carolina, Virginia, Colorado, Connecticut, South Carolina and Delaware.

By contrast, whites make up the vast majority of older Americans — 80 percent of seniors 65 and older and roughly 73 percent of people ages 45-64. Many states with high percentages of white seniors also have particularly large shares of minority children, including Arizona, Nevada, California, Texas and Florida.

“The recent emergence of this cultural generation gap in states with fast growth of young Hispanics has spurred heated discussions of immigration and the use of government services,” Frey said. “But the new census, which will show a minority majority of our youngest Americans, makes plain that our future labor force is absolutely dependent on our ability to integrate and educate a new diverse child population.”

Kenneth Johnson, a sociology professor and senior demographer at the University of New Hampshire, noted that much of the race change is being driven by increases in younger Hispanic women having more children than do white women, who have lower birth rates and as a group are moving beyond their prime childbearing years.

Because minority births are driving the rapid changes in the population, “any institution that touches or is impacted by children will be the first to feel the impact,” Johnson said, citing as an example child and maternal health care that will have to be attentive to minorities’ needs.

The numbers come amid public debate over hotly contested federal and state issues, from immigration and gay marriage to the rising cost of government benefits such as Medicare and Medicaid, that are resonating in different ways by region and demographics.

Alabama became the latest state this month to pass a wide-ranging anti-immigration law, which in part requires schools to report students’ immigration status to state authorities. That follows tough immigration measures passed in similarly Republican-leaning states such as Georgia, Arizona and South Carolina.

But governors in Massachusetts, New York and Illinois, which long have been home to numerous immigrants, have opted out of the federal Secure Communities program that aims to deport dangerous criminals, saying it has made illegal immigrants afraid of reporting crimes to police. California may soon opt out as well.

States also are divided by region over old-age benefits and gay marriage, which is legal in five states and the District of Columbia.

Among African-Americans, U.S. households headed by women — mostly single mothers but also adult women living with siblings or elderly parents — represented roughly 30 percent of all African-American households, compared with the 28 percent share of married-couple African-American households. It was the first time the number of female-headed households surpassed those of married couples among any race group, according to census records reviewed by Frey dating back to 1950.

While the number of black single mothers has been gradually declining, overall marriages among blacks are decreasing faster. That reflects a broader U.S. trend of declining marriage rates as well as increases in non-family households made up of people living alone, or with unmarried partners or other non-relatives.

Female-headed households make up a 19 percent share among Hispanics and 9 percent each for whites and Asians.

Other findings:

—Multigenerational households composed of families with grandparents, parents and children were most common among Hispanics, particularly in California, Maryland, Illinois, Nevada and Texas, all states where they represented nearly 1 in 10 Latino households.

—Roughly 581,000, or a half percent, of U.S. households are composed of same-sex unmarried couples, representing nearly 1 in 10 households with unmarried partners. Unmarried gay couples made up the biggest shares in states in the Northeast and West, led by the District of Columbia, Oregon, Delaware, Massachusetts, Maine and Vermont. The largest numbers were in California and New York, which is now considering a gay marriage law.

—Minorities comprise a majority of renters in 10 states, plus the District of Columbia — Hawaii, Texas, California, Georgia, Maryland, New Mexico, Mississippi, New Jersey, Louisiana and New York.

Tony Perkins, president of the Washington, D.C.-based Family Research Council, a conservative interest group, emphasized the economic impact of the decline of traditional families, noting that single-parent families are often the most dependent on government assistance.

“The decline of the traditional family will have to correct itself if we are to continue as a society,” Perkins said, citing a responsibility of individuals and churches. “We don’t need another dose of big government, but a new Hippocratic oath of ‘do no harm’ that doesn’t interfere with family formation or seek to redefine family.”

© Copyright 2011 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Comments (0)

Winds to Challenge Crews Battling AZ, NM Wildfires June 21, 2011

PHOENIX (AP) — Extremely high winds are expected to challenge firefighters trying to protect homes threatened by a pair of fires in southern and eastern Arizona on Sunday.

The small New Mexico town of Luna is in the path of the massive Wallow Fire burning in eastern Arizona’s Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest. Fire breached a containment line along Highway 180 on Saturday and about 200 residents were ordered to evacuate and remained out of their homes Sunday.

The evacuation order came on the same day that some other residents displaced by the fire that began May 29 were allowed to return home.

The threat to Luna lessened late Saturday but was expected to return Sunday afternoon as wind gusts of 40 to 50 mph were expected to drive the flames.

Only about half the town’s residents actually left, and the rest have been told to stay off the roads so they don’t get in the way of fire crews, Catron County Undersheriff Ian Fletcher said Sunday. Few people went to a Red Cross shelter set up in Reserve, N.M.

“If the fire comes back around or things change where they have to get out, we still have an egress point, so we will still escort them out of town,” Fletcher said. “We’re expected high winds this afternoon — we’re preparing for the worst and hoping for the best.”

The blaze has consumed nearly 800 square miles, a little more than 511,000 acres, and more than 3,500 firefighters were trying to stop its advance. The blaze is larger than a 2002 fire that burned 732 square miles and destroyed 491 buildings that had been the largest in state history. Despite its size, the latest fire has destroyed just 32 homes and four rental cabins. Containment rose to 44 percent Sunday.

In southern Arizona, a wildfire south of Sierra Vista remained 27 percent contained at about 21,000 acres, or nearly 33 square miles. About 44 home already have been destroyed by the Monument fire and about 2,600 homes were evacuated.

Fire information officer Bill Paxton said high winds Sunday morning grounded tankers that have been dropping slurry on the fire. Winds were blowing steadily at about 30 mph with gusts on the ridges of about 50 mph. About 1,000 firefighters were on the lines, and hundreds of state and local police and firefighters were helping in the area.

With summer rains still weeks away, forecasters said fire crews across the region would likely have little relief from the hot, windy weather that has dogged them for days.

Residents of Alpine, Ariz., were allowed to return to their homes Saturday morning after being forced out by the Wallow Fire for more than two weeks, but residents of the resort town of Greer still remained evacuated.

U.S. Sen. Jon Kyl, who owns a home in Greer, toured the fire area Saturday along with Sen. John McCain and Arizona congressmen Jeff Flake and Paul Gosar.

“Seeing a terrible fire like this is always a wakeup call,” Flake, a Republican who represents Arizona’s 6th district, said in a statement. “Our forest health policies need an overhaul. … In the short term, we need to address regulations that hamper timber salvage in the burnt areas. In the long term, we need to enter into public-private partnerships in order to improve the health of these forests by thinning them.”

Meanwhile, the remaining evacuations from a fire burning on both sides of the New Mexico-Colorado border were lifted Saturday morning for residents of communities outside of Raton, N.M.

Containment on the nearly 28,000-acre Track Fire jumped to 80 percent Sunday morning and fire officials said existing fire lines were holding despite strong winds in the area.

Investigators from New Mexico State Forestry and the Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railway said Saturday that fire apparently was started June 12 by engine exhaust from an all-terrain vehicle.

They said the rider was trespassing onto land owned by BNSF railway through access from nearby private property. The Colfax County Sheriff’s Department was seeking information on the person or persons riding or operating ATVs near the origin of the fire.

Another wildfire in Cochise County, Ariz., called the Horseshoe Two was 75 percent contained after charring about 210,000 acres — nearly 330 square miles.

A fire burning 9 miles north of Santa Fe, N.M., had burned about 900 acres by Sunday morning and was being driven northeast into the Pecos Wilderness, U.S. Forest Service spokeswoman Alberta Maez said. The fire broke out Saturday and was not threatening any structures, but hikers and residents In the Santa Fe Ski Basin, Aspen Basin, Aspen Vista, and Big Tesuque were told to be ready to leave is necessary.

U.S. Forest Service chief Tom Tidwell visited the Arizona fire operations Saturday to assess the progress.

All of the Arizona wildfires are believed to be human caused. Investigators believe a campfire was the most likely cause of the Wallow fire.

Authorities in southern New Mexico were also looking for “persons of interest” as they searched for the cause of a fire that burned several homes in the wooded community of Ruidoso.

Also around the West, fires still were burning near Yakima, Wash., and in southern Colorado. A wildfire near St. George, Utah, was fully contained after scorching more than 1,000 acres of federal and stare rangelands.

© Copyright 2011 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Comments (0)

Iowa Principal Quits amid Birthday Spanking Uproar June 19, 2011

MOUNT VERNON, Iowa (AP) — An elementary school principal in eastern Iowa who admitted to spanking students on their birthday has resigned.

KGAN-TV reports Washington Elementary principal Terry Eisenbarth submitted his resignation Friday night as the Mount Vernon Community Schools board was considering his fate with the district.

Parents complained after learning Eisenbarth would call students to his office on their birthday for spankings.

Eisenbarth admitted to the spankings in a May letter to parents and provided a photo of the padded stick he used to give the spankings.

Mount Vernon police investigated but found no wrongdoing. The Linn County sheriff’s office is still looking into the spankings.

Eisenbarth will get $13,500 and benefits through August.

A message left Saturday with the school district office wasn’t immediately returned. No number was listed for Eisenbarth.

© Copyright 2011 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Comments (0)

Union Official Apologizes for Calling Christie Adolf Hitler in Heated NJ Budget Battle

TRENTON, N.J.— Labor leaders rallying for collective-bargaining rights in New Jersey went on the offensive Thursday — with one even comparing Gov. Chris Christie with Adolf Hitler and two Democratic legislative leaders to his generals, then apologizing amid widespread criticism.

The stinging criticism came one day after the three agreed on a deal to sharply restrict state employee bargaining rights and increase healthcare and pension costs.

“Welcome to Nazi Germany,” Christopher Shelton, international vice president of the Communication Workers of America’s District 1, told the large crowd gathered on the Statehouse lawn. “It’s going to take World War III to get rid of Adolf Christie.”

Hours after criticism over the remarks starting coming from all directions, Shelton acknowledged that his comments were inappropriate, and he apologized to “the governor and to anyone else I may have offended.”

Carrying signs that read “negotiate, don’t legislate,” an estimated 3,500 people took to the Statehouse lawn Thursday to protest the deal, which was reached late Wednesday night with mostly support from Republicans and a few Democrats, who have long enjoyed union backing.

“I think (Christie) is doing the same thing that Scott Walker is doing in Wisconsin,” Lee Saunders, secretary-treasurer of AFSCME, told The Associated Press. “It’s unacceptable to preclude us from the right to collectively bargain for our rights.”

The rally was planned before Christie, Senate President Stephen Sweeney and Assembly Speaker Sheila Oliver agreed to put forward a bill to require the state’s 500,000 government employees to pay a portion of their health care premiums based on income and to contribute more toward their pensions.

“I view this as union busting,” said Jersey City police officer Mark Razzoli, who accused lawmakers of trying to turn the public against public workers when he said lawmakers deserved blame for raiding the pension system in flush years.

“Not that long ago, we were heroes, you know,” Razzoli said. “I was at ground zero, as many other people were. It is disgraceful what is going on here.”

Several Democratic lawmakers told the rally they opposed the deal; that group included Senator Ray Lesniak and Assemblymen Daniel Benson, Patrick Diegnan, Wayne DeAngelo, Reed Gusciora, and Vincent Prieto.

“Today is the difference between sheep and lions,” Gusciora, D-Princeton, said. “There’s a lot of sheep inside while the lions are out here protecting workers’ rights.”

DeAngelo told the crowd: “I’m not inside because my mind is already made up.”

Inside the Statehouse, a Senate budget committee was considering the bill sponsored by Senate President Stephen Sweeney, an official with the ironworkers union.

As Sweeney spoke, union members at the rally chanted “Sweeney is a rat” with some pointing to a 10-foot inflatable rat holding a sign saying: “Pension Betrayal.”

Workers also brought along a coffin with a sign proclaiming: “The death of collective bargaining.”

The Senate panel passed the measure 9-4, with four Democrats supporting it, but not before 25 union members were taken out of the hearing room and arrested for disorderly conduct because they were chanting, “Kill the bill.”

The Assembly and full Senate are to consider the bill next week in what is expected to be a contentious vote, given that all 120 legislators are up for re-election in November — a fact that union leaders noted Thursday with this warning: “We’ll remember in November.”

Sweeney seemed unfazed, saying, “I’m not going to be here to be told what to do.”

Christie said public employees in New Jersey eventually will thank him and the leaders of the Democratic-majority for saving their pensions.

“New Jersey is setting a model for dealing with these problems in an honest, forthright and bipartisan way,” the governor said.

Lou Venezia, a 33-year-old firefighter in Bloomfield, wasn’t in a thanking mood when he compared lawmakers to criminals.

“I’m down here protesting all the pimps, thieves, prostitutes and racketeers,” Venezia said, “and I’m not at Trenton State Prison, I’m at the Statehouse.”

Amid the unfiltered criticism, there was a call for temperance.

Lesniak, D-Elizabeth, who was opposed by the NJEA in a tough primary election last week, urged Democrats to distance themselves from inflammatory genocide remarks.

“We cannot support equating Chris Christie and Steve Sweeney and Sheila Oliver with Nazis,” Lesniak said. “We support your rights totally, but we cannot be associated with those comments.”

More rallies are planned for next week.

© Copyright 2011 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Comments (0)

Group Gathers 714K Names to Repeal Ohio Union Law June 18, 2011

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Opponents of Ohio’s new collective bargaining law say they have collected hundreds of thousands more signatures than needed in their effort to let voters decide whether to repeal the measure this fall.

A spokeswoman for the group We Are Ohio said Friday it has gathered more than 714,000 signatures. They still must be checked by the state’s election chief to ensure enough are legitimate.

The group is making a final petition push in the coming weeks. It needs more than 231,000 valid signatures by June 30 to get the issue on the November ballot. The signatures have to be from at least 44 of the 88 counties.

The law signed by Republican Gov. John Kasich (KAY’-sik) in late March bans public employee strikes and restricts collective bargaining rights for more than 350,000 teachers, police officers, state employees and others.

© Copyright 2011 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Comments (0)

U.S. Catholic Bishops Defend Policy on Sex Abuse June 17, 2011

By Elaine Porterfield

SEATTLE (Reuters) – Leaders of the U.S. Roman
Catholic Church unveiled proposed changes Wednesday to their
policy governing cases of sex abuse, dismissing criticism they
are only tweaking at the margins.

The U.S. church has taken strong steps to address sex abuse
by priests and will vote Thursday to enact revisions to its
2002 Charter for the Protection of Children and Young People,
said Bishop Blase Cupich of Spokane, Washington, who heads the
U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops committee on the subject.

“I would point out there are nearly 200 dioceses in the
United States and we are seeing that the charter is working,”
Cupich told reporters at a bishops’ meeting in Seattle.

“If we look at the cases … it was when the charter was
not followed correctly we got into difficulty. It goes back to
the importance of staying with the charter,” he said.

The bishops’ charter, revised once before in 2005, was
created when cases of priest abuse emerged in Boston and then
across the United States and the world. The U.S. church has
paid some $2 billion in settlements, bankrupting a handful of
dioceses.

The church has also been stung by recent sex abuse and
child pornography accusations against clergy in Philadelphia,
Kansas City, Missouri, and elsewhere.

Most of the proposed revisions bring the U.S. charter into
line with the Vatican’s dictates on the definition of minors
subjected to abuse and the requirement to report abuse
accusations against bishops.

Included in the draft is Pope Benedict’s pronouncement to
U.S. bishops in 2008 to “bind up the wounds caused by every
breach of trust, to foster healing, to promote reconciliation
and to reach out with loving concern to those so seriously
wronged.”

Victims’ groups such as the Survivors Network of those
Abused by Priests have criticized the charter as inadequate and
a recent study commissioned by the U.S. bishops as a whitewash
of what they believe is an ongoing crisis in the church.

The groups want the church to spell out punishments for
bishops and others in the church hierarchy who have covered up
for offending clergy. They also want strict reporting of
accusations, not just those that are “proven.”

“One change (to the charter) is including child pornography
as a case of child abuse,” Cupich said.

“We deal directly and transparently when allegations are
made,” Cupich said. “Immediately, of course, it’s reported to
the police. If in fact it is admitted or proven credible, that
priest is removed from the ministry.”

“Our priests have background checks. … There are a number
of measures like that which are very strict. We are going to
continue to tighten it up. We have a commitment to protect
children,” he said.

 

END ASSISTED SUICIDE

The bishops also prepared to issue a statement Thursday
opposing assisted suicide — in which doctors can prescribe a
fatal dose of medication that the patient can take. The
practice is legal in Oregon, Washington and Montana.

Cardinal Daniel DiNardo of Galveston-Houston said the
bishops needed to make a strong statement on “why we consider
it dangerous and why we consider it an assault on the human
person.”

“Compassion is most stated when we come to the aid of a
person … by giving them help, not by ending their lives,” he
said.

Addressing the bishops’ move, supporters of assisted
suicide said the Catholic Church should not dictate laws.

“The choice of how to address suffering and terminal
illness must be the province of dying individuals themselves in
consultation with their doctors, their loved ones, their
clergy, and their conscience,” said Barbara Lee, president of
the group Compassion Choices.

DiNardo said gravely ill patients needed support, not help
from doctors to kill themselves.

“Medicine is not around to end people’s lives. Medicine is
tainted by physician-assisted suicide,” he said.
(Editing by Andrew Stern and Peter Cooney)

© 2011 Thomson/Reuters. All rights reserved.

Comments (0)

NJ Dem Calls for Limits on Christie’s Chopper Use June 15, 2011

TRENTON, N.J. — The head of a legislative homeland security panel in New Jersey is calling for restrictions on the governor’s use of state helicopters for transportation and a ban on air transit to personal and political events.

Democratic Assemblywoman Annette Quijano (kee-HAH’-noh) says she’ll introduce on Thursday legislation that would restrict the governor’s use of helicopters to official functions and emergencies.

Republican Gov. Chris Christie and his staff came under scrutiny after media reports said he used state police helicopters to catch his son’s high school baseball games and to meet with donors trying to persuade him to run for president.

Christie and the Republican State Committee later reimbursed taxpayers for the trips.

State police Col. Rick Fuentes says the governor is safer traveling by helicopter than by car.

© Copyright 2011 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Comments (0)

Airport Workers Honored for Stopping Rape

DENVER — Police say the Frontier Airlines’ employees who came to the aid of a woman being assaulted at Denver International Airport are being honored for their actions.

Denver police said Mark Adams and Kris Musil will be presented with the Bill Daniels Neighborhood Hero Awards for assisting a woman they was being raped at an empty gate in April.

Police say Adams and Musil were on a ramp at the airport when they witnessed the attack, ran to the gate and assisted the woman. The two told KMGH-TV they wish they could have gotten there sooner.

The victim’s family members have raised questions about the airport’s security, saying some employees witnessed the attack and walked by without intervening. DIA officials say airport workers responded appropriately.

© Copyright 2011 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Comments (0)