Guess Who Leads the Bribery World?
The USA is the most corrupt country in the world and I have 10,000 posts that point heavily to that fact…

20 NY Costco Workers Share $202 Million Powerball Jackpot June 17, 2011

MELVILLE, N.Y. — Twenty employees of a New York big box store are the latest lottery millionaires.

The employees who work at a Long Island Costco store stepped forward Thursday to collect a $201.9 million jackpot.

The winners say they had been chipping in $5 each for Powerball tickets for only about a month before their winning numbers came in during a June 1 drawing.

The winners range in age from 24 to 73. They say they intend to make smart investments, although some conceded new cars and a trip to Las Vegas are in their plans. They say they have not decided whether to keep their jobs.

The owner of a Lindenhurst store where the winning ticket was purchased was presented with a $10,000 bonus check for selling it.

© Copyright 2011 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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NAACP Tells Obama: Focus on Jobs June 14, 2011

It’s not just those on the right who are criticizing President Barack Obama for lack of action to create more jobs. The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) says both the Obama administration and Congress must do more, with unemployment at 9.1 percent, The Hill reports.

NAACP President Benjamin Todd Jealous

“We first and foremost want them to pay attention to the economy and the high rates of joblessness in the black community,” NAACP President Benjamin Todd Jealous told reporters last week. “It is unacceptable for us to be 2½ years into a recession and still be fighting for Congress to accept responsibility to get working-class people back into this economy.” 

As for Obama, “The sense on the street, and I just came back from meeting folks in Harlem for instance, the sense on the street is that the administration should be harder and more aggressive on this,” he said.

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Some Gay-rights Foes Claim They Now Are Bullied June 12, 2011

NEW YORK (AP) — As the gay-rights movement advances, there’s increasing evidence of an intriguing role reversal: Today, it’s the conservative opponents of that movement who seem eager to depict themselves as victims of intolerance.

To them, the gay-rights lobby has morphed into a relentless bully — pressuring companies and law firms into policy reversals, making it taboo in some circumstances to express opposition to same-sex marriage.

“They’re advocating for a lot of changes in the name of tolerance,” said Jim Campbell, an attorney with the conservative Alliance Defense Fund. “Yet ironically the tolerance is not returned, for people of faith who don’t agree with their agenda.”

Many gay activists, recalling their movement’s past struggles and mindful of remaining bias, consider such protestations by their foes to be hollow and hypocritical.

“They lost the argument on gay people and now they are losing the argument on marriage,” said lawyer Evan Wolfson, president of the advocacy group Freedom to Marry. “Diversions, scare tactics and this playing the victim are all they have left.”

He added: “There’s been a shift in the moral understanding of people — that exclusion from marriage and anti-gay prejudice is wrong. Positions that wouldn’t have been questioned in the past are now being held up to the light.”

Among the recent incidents prompting some conservatives to complain of intolerance or political bullying:

—Olympic gold medal gymnast Peter Vidmar stepped down as chief of mission for the 2012 U.S. Olympic team in May following controversy over his opposition to gay marriage. Vidmar, a Mormon, had publicly supported Proposition 8, the voter-approved law passed in 2008 that restricted marriage in California to one man and one woman.

—After coming under fire from gay-rights groups in April, the Atlanta-based law firm King Spalding pulled out of an agreement with House Republicans to defend the federal ban on same-sex marriage.

—In New York, state Sen. Ruben Diaz, a Democrat from the Bronx, contends he’s received death threats because he opposes legislation to legalize same-sex marriage. The alleged threats were cited last week by the New York State Catholic Conference, which also opposes gay marriage.

“We are unjustly called ‘haters’ and ‘bigots’ by those who have carefully framed their advocacy strategy,” wrote the conference’s executive director, Richard Barnes. “The entire campaign to enact same-sex marriage is conducted under a banner of acceptance … Yet behind that banner of tolerance is another campaign — of intimidation, threats and ugliness.”

—Apple Inc. recently withdrew two iPhone apps from its App Store after complaints and petition campaigns by gay-rights supporters.

One app was intended to publicize the Manhattan Declaration, a document signed in 2009 by scores of conservative Christian leaders. It condemns same-sex marriage as immoral and suggests that legalizing it could open the door to recognition of polygamy and sibling incest.

The other app was for Exodus International, a network of ministries which depict homosexuality as a destructive condition that can be overcome through Christian faith.

In both cases, gay activists celebrated the apps’ removals, while the apps’ creators contended their freedom of expression was being unjustly curtailed.

“The gay-rights groups have shown their fangs,” wrote Chuck Colson, the Watergate figure turned born-again Christian who helped launch the Manhattan Declaration. “They want to silence, yes, destroy those who don’t agree with their agenda.”

Exodus International president Alan Chambers, who says he changed his own sexual orientation through religious counseling, said he was alarmed by the aggressive tactics of “savvy gay activists.”

“We have seen individuals, ministries and even private corporations that dare to hold to a biblical worldview on sexuality bullied into a corner,” Chambers wrote in a blog.

However, Wolfson said the Exodus app deserved to be removed. “They were peddling something that’s been repudiated as crackpot quackery.”

The campaign that pressured King Spalding to withdraw from the Defense of Marriage Act case was criticized by a relatively wide range of commentators and legal experts, not just conservative foes of gay marriage.

“To think it’s a good idea to attack lawyers defending unpopular clients — I don’t have words for how stupid and wrong that is,” said Wendy Kaminer, a lawyer and writer who formerly served on the board of the American Civil Liberties Union.

However, the gay-rights activists involved in pressuring King Spalding were unapologetic.

“If we made it such that no law firm would defend the indefensible, then good for us,” said Fred Sainz, the Human Rights Campaign’s vice president for communication. “When you have people talking about the fact that it’s no longer politically correct to be anti-equality, it’s a show of progress.”

Sainz said it was important for activists to pick their targets carefully.

“We understand there are goodhearted Americans in the middle who are still struggling with these issues,” he said. “Different activists have different ways of getting to the same end, and some of those are bound to make certain people feel uncomfortable.”

Though same-sex marriage is legal in only five states, it has for the first time gained the support of a majority of Americans, according to a series of recent national opinion polls. For some gay activists, this trend has fueled efforts to make their opponents’ views seem shameful.

“Their beliefs on this issue are very quickly becoming socially disgraceful, much in the way white supremacy is socially disgraceful,” wrote Evan Hurst of the advocacy group Truth Wins Out. “They are certainly entitled to cling to backwoods, uneducated, reality-rejecting views … but their ‘religious freedom’ doesn’t call for the rest of us to somehow pretend their views aren’t disgusting and hateful.”

However, some gay-rights supporters see the public opinion shift as reason to be more magnanimous.

“The turn we now need to execute will be the hardest maneuver the movement has ever had to make, because it will require us to deliberately leave room for homophobia,” Jonathan Rauch, a writer and guest scholar at the Brookings Institution, wrote recently in The Advocate, a gay-oriented news magazine.

“Incidents of rage against ‘haters,’ verbal abuse of opponents, boycotts of small-business owners, absolutist enforcement of anti-discrimination laws: Those and other ‘zero-tolerance’ tactics play into the ‘homosexual bullies’ narrative,” Rauch wrote. “The other side, in short, is counting on us to hand them the victimhood weapon. Our task is to deny it to them.”

As ideological foes spar over these issues, the American Civil Liberties Union is confronted with a delicate balancing act. Its national gay rights project battles aggressively against anti-gay discrimination, but, as a longtime defender of free speech, the ACLU also is expected to intervene sometimes on behalf of anti-gay expression.

For example, the ACLU pressed a lawsuit on behalf of the fundamentalist Westboro Baptist Church, which has outraged mourning communities by picketing service members’ funerals with crudely worded signs condemning homosexuality. The ACLU said the Missouri state law banning such picketing infringes on religious freedom and free speech.

Some critics — such as Wendy Kaminer — have contended that the ACLU now tilts too much toward espousing gay rights, at the expense of a more vigorous defense of anti-gay free speech.

However, James Esseks, director of the ACLU’s gay rights project, said the First Amendment protection of free speech only comes into play when a government entity is seen as curtailing speech rights — which did not occur in the Vidmar or King Spalding cases.

“What we have there is simply the push and pull in public policy discourse … which is sometimes rough and tumble,” Esseks said. “Being stigmatized for expressing unpopular views is part of being in a free society. There’s nothing wrong with that.”

Robert George, a conservative professor of jurisprudence at Princeton and one of the co-authors of the Manhattan Declaration, shared Esseks’ view on the often sharp-elbowed nature of public debate in America.

“Democratic politics is a messy business and sometimes it’s a contact sport,” said George, a co-founder of the National Organization for Marriage, which campaigns against same-sex marriage. He suggested that those who hold cultural power — in academia, the media and elsewhere — are inevitably going to try to impose their viewpoints.

“The power to intimidate people, to make them fear they’ll be called a bigot or denied opportunities for jobs, only works if people allow themselves to be bullied,” George said. “Conservatives who make themselves out to be victims run the risk of playing into the hands of their opponents, suggesting that their opponents’ cultural power is so vast that there’s no way it can be resisted.”

To professional free-speech advocates — such as Joan Bertin, executive director of the National Coalition Against Censorship — the gay rights vs. free expression cases are fascinating and often difficult.

“It’s very volatile — it requires you to parse the issues very closely,” she said. “I’m of the school of thought that you should know your enemy. You need to know what people are thinking.”

___(equals)

David Crary can be reached at http://twitter.com/CraryAP

© Copyright 2011 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Alabama Passes Tough Illegal-immigration Law June 10, 2011

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — Alabama vaulted past Arizona on Thursday with what is being called the most restrictive law in the nation against illegal immigration, requiring schools to find out if students are in the country lawfully and making it a crime to knowingly give an illegal immigrant a ride.

Advocacy groups promised to challenge the sweeping measure, which like Arizona’s law also allows police to arrest anyone suspected of being an illegal immigrant if the person is stopped for some other reason. In addition, it requires all businesses to check the legal status of workers using a federal system called E-Verify.

“It is clearly unconstitutional. It’s mean-spirited, racist, and we think a court will enjoin it,” said Mary Bauer, legal director for the Southern Poverty Law Center.

It takes effect Sept. 1.

Republican Gov. Robert Bentley, who signed it into law on Thursday, expressed confidence it would withstand any legal challenges.

“We have a real problem with illegal immigration in this country,” he said. “I campaigned for the toughest immigration laws, and I’m proud of the Legislature for working tirelessly to create the strongest immigration bill in the country.”

Alabama has an estimated 120,000 illegal immigrants, a nearly fivefold increase from a decade ago, according to the Pew Hispanic Center. Many of them are believed to be working on farms, at chicken processing plants and in construction.

One of the legislation’s sponsors, GOP Sen. Scott Beason, said it would help the unemployed by preventing illegal immigrants from getting jobs in the state. Alabama’s unemployment rate stood at 9.3 percent in April, the most recent figures available.

“This will put thousands of Alabamians back in the work force,” Beason said.

The measure instantly puts Alabama at the forefront of the immigration debate. Organizations such as the American Civil Liberties Union and the Southern Poverty Law Center agreed that it is the nation’s toughest crackdown on illegal immigration.

Linton Joaquin, general counsel for the National Immigration Law Center in Los Angeles, said the Alabama law covers all aspects of an immigrant’s life.

“It is a sweeping attack on immigrants and people of color in general. It adds restrictions on education, housing and other areas. It is a very broad attack,” Joaquin said.

Among other things, the law makes it a crime for landlords to knowingly rent to an illegal immigrant.

Another provision makes it a crime to transport a known illegal immigrant. Arizona’s law appears narrower: It includes language against human smuggling and makes it illegal to pick up laborers for work if doing so impedes traffic.

Alabama’s law also goes further in requiring schools to check the immigration status of their students. The measure does not prohibit illegal immigrants from attending public schools; lawmakers said the purpose instead is to gather data on how many are enrolled and how the much the state is spending to educate them.

Jared Shepherd, an attorney for the ACLU, warned that because of that provision, some immigrant parents may not send their children to school for fear of arrest or deportation.

Activists such as Shay Farley, legal director of Alabama Appleseed, an immigrant advocacy group, said the bill invites racial profiling not only by law enforcement officers but by landlords and employers.

“It’s going to make us profile our neighbors and our church brothers and sisters,” Farley said.

Alabama’s Hispanic population more than doubled between 2000 and 2010 to 186,000, or 3.9 percent of the state’s nearly 4.8 million people, according to the Census.

Some farmers and other small businesses had hoped to be exempted from having to verify the immigration status of employees, fearing the database would be too costly and add too much red tape. Georgia’s recently passed immigration law, for instance, exempts businesses with fewer than 10 employees from using the database.

Alabama’s measure was modeled on Arizona’s. A federal judge blocked the most controversial parts of Arizona’s law last year after the Justice Department sued.

That includes the provision that required police to check people’s immigration status while enforcing other laws if there was reason to believe the person was in the country illegally. The case appears headed for the U.S. Supreme Court.

A less restrictive law in Utah also was blocked after a lawsuit was filed.

Civil liberties groups have also sued to try to block Georgia’s law cracking down on illegal immigration.

© Copyright 2011 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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5 Arrested as Wis. Supreme Court Hears Collective-Bargaining Arguments June 8, 2011

Five people were arrested at the Wisconsin state Capitol on Monday as the Supreme Court heard arguments over whether a bill taking away collective-bargaining rights passed the Legislature legally.

Four people were arrested and cited for disorderly conduct after trying to enter the building without stopping for police clearance through metal detectors, Capitol Police Chief Charles Tubbs said. A fifth person was arrested and cited for trying to prop open a door, presumably so others could enter later to avoid police, Tubbs said.

There were no reports of weapons or violence, said Capitol police spokeswoman Lori Getter.

Also on Monday, Madison police cited two people for disorderly conduct following a disturbance inside the foyer of MI bank, 1 W. Main St. Police said about 30 protesters entered the area between two doors leading into the bank and were told they needed to leave or be arrested. One officer suffered a sprained wrist during a struggle with a demonstrator.

Three demonstrators also were cited for obstructing a roadway after they refused to get out of the street, police said.

Tubbs said 27 people were arrested and cited for disorderly conduct for interrupting Friday’s session of the Joint Finance Committee. All received warnings before their arrests, he said, adding, “They felt they had a passion and they had to do it.”

No problems had been reported in the Supreme Court chamber where legal arguments took place Monday, he said. Passage of the bill at issue had attracted tens of thousands of people to the Capitol in February and March.

About 75 people listened to the arguments, but most were attorneys.

Tubbs said Capitol Police have not had any problems associated with the “Walkerville” protest encampment that began Saturday on city property across from the Capitol.

“People seem to understand our responsibility as law enforcement,” he said.

“What we’re doing is trying to maintain a high degree of security for the Capitol,” Tubbs said, including knowing who’s going in and out and what they’re bringing into the building.

“We are looking into the possibility of opening more doors,” he said, adding, “We have not reached that point.”

Currently, just two of the Capitol’s doors are open.

Tubbs also said the metal detectors installed during the height of the protests might be here to stay.

With temperatures in the 90s expected to continue through Wednesday, Tubbs said, there are concerns that tensions could also heat up. He stressed the importance for people who are out in the heat to have adequate food and fresh water and to limit alcohol consumption.

Tubbs said Capitol Police will be re-evaluating staffing needs with 10 vacancies from recent retirements and officers leaving for other jobs. Currently, 41 out of 51½ full-time positions are filled.

The number of retirements this year is greater than in the past three years, he said, adding that the unrest surrounding Gov. Scott Walker’s efforts to eliminate most collective bargaining rights for most public employees and other budget proposals has likely contributed to some retirements.

Capitol police have created a new website to provide updates on security issues at wicapitol.wi.gov.

© Copyright 2011 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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WashPost Fact Check: Obama Misled on Auto Bailout Speech

President Barack Obama’s recent speech in Ohio extolling the success of the auto bailout is a misleading collection of assertions and virtually every claim “needs an asterisk, just like the fine print in that too-good-to-be-true car loan,” The Washington Post concluded in a fact check of the address.

President Barack Obama speaks at a Chrysler plant. (Getty Images Photo)

The Post started with the president’s claim that Chrysler has repaid every “dime and more of what it owes American taxpayers for their support during my presidency.”

What the president didn’t say is that, although the auto company paid back the $8.5 billion loan from the Obama administration, still outstanding is the additional $4 billion borrowed from the Bush administration.

The Treasury Department has said that the government will not recoup about $1.3 billion of the entire $12.5 billion investment, the Post reported.

The president also played fast and loose with claims that U.S. automakers are adding shifts and creating jobs at the strongest rate since the 1990s, that GM plans to hire back all those laid off during the recession, and that many in Washington thought the country should do nothing when Chrysler and GM faced collapse.

“The president is straining too hard. If the auto industry bailout is really a success, there should be no need to resort to trumped-up rhetoric and phony accounting to make your case. Let the facts speak for themselves,” the Post concluded.

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GOP House Leaders Propose Plan to Cut Federal Workforce

Key House GOP leaders have detailed plans to cut the federal workforce by hiring one person for every three who leave jobs. If adopted, the plan would cut the number of federal workers by 10 percent by 2015, The Washington Post reported.

Rep. Dennis Ross of Florida: As “these workers leave, we cannot let this opportunity to save taxpayer money pass.”

Reps. Darrell Issa of California, Dennis Ross of Florida, and Jason Chaffetz of Utah put forth the plan, which would save an estimated $127.5 billion over 10 years, if enacted, the Post reported.

Under the plan, the government would be required to track the number of employees and report to Congress quarterly. If the workforce exceeded 90 percent of the current size of government, no agency would be allowed to make hires. Exceptions would be made for emergencies, national security, and war, according to the Post.

Ross told the Post that government statistics show that about 400,000 federal workers are eligible for retirement and, as “these workers leave, we cannot let this opportunity to save taxpayer money pass.” The proposal stems from President Barack Obama’s bipartisan fiscal commission and was part of Rep. Paul Ryan’s wide-ranging budget plan, the Post reported.

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Geithner Touts GM, Chrysler Rebounds Since Bailouts June 2, 2011

The further success of General Motors and Chrysler is by no means guaranteed, but the decision for the federal government to spend tens of billions of dollars to bail them out was the right one, Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner wrote in an Op-Ed published in The Washington Post. Geithner noted that American automakers have returned to profitability just two years after GM filed for bankruptcy.

Timothy Geithner: “We cannot guarantee their success . . . But we’ve given them a better shot. (AP Photo)

“The industry has added new shifts and 115,000 jobs, and GM and Chrysler have returned more than 50 percent of the government’s investment,” he wrote. “The industry is mounting one of the most improbable turnarounds in recent history.”

The industry was facing the prospect of liquidation when President George W. Bush first provided the two automakers $17 billion in loans in December 2008, he wrote. (Ford Motor Co. eschewed the bailouts.) When the Obama administration came in in 2009, it was clear that more money was needed.

“The companies needed to make dramatic changes. Years of bad decisions had caused them to progressively lose market share to foreign competitors, and the financial crisis had dried up financing for almost everything, compounding the collapse in demand for vehicles. It was not clear whether there was a responsible way to put taxpayer dollars on the line in a way that helped ensure the companies emerged stronger, not weaker.”

However, Geithner said the link between the automakers and their supply chains and dealerships “led some experts to estimate that at least 1 million jobs could have been lost if GM and Chrysler went under.”

In return for the bailout, the government demanded tough concessions from Chrysler and from GM. They were forced to go through bankruptcy and adopt plans that would lead to profitability. The sacrifices, he wrote, included those from managers, unions, stockholders, creditors and dealers.

“Today, six years earlier than planned, Chrysler has repaid its outstanding government loans. While it has a long way to go, Chrysler has made enormous strides. Tough decisions, stemming from the restructuring, have helped Chrysler post five consecutive quarters of operating profit. It has announced more than $3 billion in investments in plants and technology since emerging from bankruptcy and is poised to hire back workers.

“The story has been similar for GM — and the industry as a whole. The domestic automakers are getting stronger. For the first time since 2004, each has achieved positive quarterly net income.”

Geithner acknowledged that the government will “not get back all of our investments in the industry, we will recover much more than most predicted, and far sooner.”

He concluded by noting, “We cannot guarantee their success, and at some point they may stumble. But we’ve given them a better shot. The choice to stop the American automobile industry from unraveling was the right one.”

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Boxer, Casey: Don’t Pay Congress if Govt Defaults

Sens. Barbara Boxer, D-Calif., and Bob Casey, D-Pa., are pulling out all the stops to ensure an increase in the debt ceiling, which many Republicans oppose unless Democrats agree to significant additional budget cuts. The two senators are urging Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner to dock pay for congressmen if the government defaults on its debt, Politico reports.

A letter that Boxer and Casey wrote to Geithner Tuesday says: “We agree with you that it is unthinkable that the United States could default on its obligations, and that the consequences of inaction would be disastrous for our economy.

“There is no reason that Members of Congress and the President should be free from the pain that would be felt by our nation if the government were to default . . . If we cannot do our jobs and protect the full faith and credit of the United States, we should not get paid.”

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Holder: Petty Offenders Should Await Trial at Home

WASHINGTON (AP) — Most non-violent offenders awaiting trial could be supervised at home instead of being placed in jail without endangering the community, Attorney General Eric Holder said Wednesday.

Holder, speaking at the National Symposium on Pretrial Justice, said many Americans accused of nonviolent or petty offenses remain in jail before trial simply because they cannot afford to post bail of even a few hundred dollars. Nearly two-thirds of inmates in county jails are awaiting trial, many for nonviolent crimes, at a huge cost to taxpayers, he said. And inmates who lose their jobs can also become ineligible for health benefits, relying on emergency rooms for routine treatment after their release.

“Almost all of these individuals could be released and supervised in their communities — and allowed to pursue or maintain employment, and participate in educational opportunities and their normal family lives — without risk of endangering their fellow citizens or fleeing from justice,” Holder said in his prepared remarks.

Holder told an audience of prosecutors, police officials and lawyers that society needs to continue developing better alternatives to incarceration.

He said the Department of Justice was providing guidance to local communities about how best to manage offenders awaiting trial and was also continuing to support programs aimed at helping inmates re-enter society after they serve their sentence and are released from custody.

The two-day symposium comes nearly 50 years after a similar summit, the National Conference on Bail and Criminal Justice, that was organized in 1964 by then-Attorney General Robert Kennedy. That conference paved the way for the Federal Bail Reform Act of 1966, which Holder said created the first major restructuring of bail system since the early days of the country.

A panel discussion on the criminal justice system earlier Wednesday included District of Columbia Police Chief Cathy Lanier and Philadelphia District Attorney Seth Williams, among others.

© Copyright 2011 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Depression Did I Just Read Depression? CNBC Just Printed Depression… June 1, 2011

Wall Street is having a hard time figuring out what to do now that the U.S. economy appears to be sputtering and yields are so low, Peter Yastrow, market strategist for Yastrow Origer, told CNBC.

“What we’ve got right now is almost near panic going on with money managers and people who are responsible for money,” he said. “They can not find a yield and you just don’t want to be putting your money into commodities or things that are punts that might work out or they might not depending on what happens with the economy.

“We need to find real yield and real returns on these assets. You see bad data, you see Treasurys rally, you see all bonds and all fixed-income rally and then the people who are betting against the U.S. economy start getting bearish on stocks. That’s a huge mistake.”

Stocks extended losses after the manufacturing fell below expectations in May and the private sector added only 38,000 jobs during the month.

“Interest rates are amazingly low and that, thanks to Ben Bernanke, is driving everything,” Yastrow said. “We’re on the verge of a great, great depression. The [Federal Reserve] knows it.

http://www.cnbc.com/id/43236764

Coffee Talk!

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It is Just Wrong and the TSA needs to go… May 23, 2011

Empire-Building TSA Gropocrats

Posted by Thomas DiLorenzo on May 23, 2011 06:10 AM

All government bureaucrats are incessant propagandists and empire builders.  They are constantly attempting to expand their “domains” in order to justify their jobs, perks, and promotions.  A recent example of this is how TSA bureaucrats have imposed themselves on high school proms, groping young teenage girls all dressed up in their prom gowns…

Americans are becoming worthless, scared and government bottle fed babies…

Coffee Talk!

Source: http://www.lewrockwell.com/blog/lewrw/archives/88544.html

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