Guess Who Leads the Bribery World?
The USA is the most corrupt country in the world and I have 10,000 posts that point heavily to that fact…

Obama Commerce Nominee Tries to Reassure Republicans June 23, 2011

WASHINGTON — Former energy company executive John Bryson Tuesday sought to persuade Republicans he would be a strong voice for business in President Barack Obama’s administration if confirmed as Commerce Secretary.

“The reason that President Obama reached out to me was my business experience,” Bryson told the Senate Commerce Committee during a hearing in which he faced questions about his support for unpopular cap-and-trade legislation to curb carbon emissions believed to contribute to global climate change.

However, Sen, John Thune, R-S.D., said Bryson could have a hard time winning approval until Obama formally submits three long-delayed free trade agreements with South Korea, Panama and Colombia to Congress for approval.

Republicans said three months ago they would oppose any of Obama’s trade nominees until he sends the deals to Congress and are still waiting for him to do that, Thune said.

Bryson served as chief executive of California utility Edison International from 1990 to 2008 before becoming chairman of BrightSource Energy, a solar energy company.

He told the Senate panel his top priority would be to help the U.S. economy create more jobs.

“If confirmed, I will be a voice in this administration for simplifying regulations that are difficult to understand and eliminating regulations that are unnecessary,” he said.

Bryson, who resigned last week from Boeing’s board of directors, also criticized the National Labor Relations Board’s decision to pursue a formal complaint against the aircraft manufacturer for its decision to site a 787 Dreamliner assembly line in non-union South Carolina.

“I think it’s not the right judgment,” Bryson said. “We thought we were doing the right thing for the country” by locating the jobs in South Carolina instead of moving them overseas, Bryson said.

The NRLB complaint asserts Boeing located the jobs in South Carolina to punish the International Association of Machinists for past strikes.

Before Tuesday’s hearing, Sen. John Barrasso, a member of the Senate Republican leadership, branded Bryson an “environmental extremist” for his support of cap-and-trade legislation that failed to clear the Senate and his role in founding the Natural Resource Defense Council, a leading environmental group.

No Republican used that term during the confirmation hearing on Tuesday, but Sen. Jim DeMint said he hoped Bryson would have the “courage to speak up against some of most anti-business policies I think we have ever seen in our country” under the Obama administration.

Commerce Committee Chairman Jay Rockefeller, a West Virginia Democrat, pressed Bryson for assurances his support for cap-and-trade legislation did not mean he would press for phasing out the use of coal.

“No, not at all,” Bryson said, saying he believed the United States had to rely on a diverse mix of fuels.

© 2011 Thomson/Reuters. All rights reserved.

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Private Jets Return to Skies After Recessionary Layovers June 8, 2011

Private jet-setters, start your engines. That’s the flight plan at some airports, where private jets that had been mothballed partly because of the recession are rolling out of hangars and queuing up on the tarmac.

Although private jets are joining their commercial cousins in the air again, private traffic still lags behind its high points, according to USA Today. “We are not back to late ’07, early ’08 levels, but we’re really off the bottom of where we were,” says Lou Seno, president and CEO of JSSI, a company that sets up maintenance for hundreds of corporate aircraft.

“In the fall of 2008, following the decline of the financial markets . . . flying literally fell off the charts, and because of the economy and everything else, it has been slow to recover,” Seno told USA Today. “But the recovery we’re seeing has been encouraging.”

Seno’s company noticed an 11.4 percent increase in flight hours during the first three months of this year compared with the same period last year. In April, flying time among JSSI roughly 1,300 customers increased 7 percent compared with April 2010.

Those stats are similar to those at other companies, analysts told USA Today

Private flying has been increasing since March 2009, when business jets’ departures and landings had plummeted 35 percent from their peak in April 2008, industry analyst Brian Foley said. It’s now down about 10 percent from that high point, he said.

Some private jet businesses, such as charter operators and fuel providers, are doing better, but aircraft manufacturers still are grounded, Foley told USA Today.

And Dan Hubbard, spokesman for the National Business Aviation Association, told USA Today: “I think business aviation is looking like the broader economy. You’re seeing some indications that [give] you reason for cautious optimism, but [there's] a lot of mixed signals.”

© Newsmax. All rights reserved.

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US subsidies to Boeing ‘illegal’ March 31, 2011

The dispute between Boeing and rival Airbus has been going on for six years

US aircraft manufacturer Boeing received at least $5.3bn (£3.3bn) in unfair aid from Washington, the World Trade Organization (WTO) has concluded.

The subsidies included money for research and development from the Nasa space agency, a panel of international trade judges has ruled.

Last year the WTO said that Boeing’s arch rival Airbus had received illegal aid from European governments.

The two companies have been at war over state aid for almost six years.

The case is one of the most complex ever brought before Geneva-based WTO, which has issued 2,000 pages of rulings.

Both companies claimed that the WTO’s latest ruling bolstered their case.

“It’s time for Boeing to stop denying or minimising the massive illegal subsidies it gets,” said Rainer Ohler, head of public affairs at Airbus.

But Boeing said that the WTO’s ruling on the size of its aid, $5.3bn, was dwarfed by the $20bn that Airbus had received.

“This WTO ruling shatters the convenient myth that European governments must illegally subsidise Airbus to counter US government assistance to Boeing,” said Michael Luttig, general counsel at Boeing.

Europe had claimed that Boeing had received ten sorts of illegal subsidies worth $19.1bn between 1989 and 2006.

The WTO did not uphold all of the claims.

But it said that some of the subsidies, including the Nasa contracts and some tax breaks, had had a serious impact on Airbus’ interests.

“The effect of these subsidies was displacement and impedance of Airbus large civil aircraft from third country markets, significant price suppression and significant lost sales,” said the WTO in a statement.

It has recommended that the US withdraw the subsidies.

The European Union’s trade commissioner Karel De Gucht said the ruling confirmed Brussels’ suspicions.

“This WTO panel report clearly shows that Boeing has received huge subsidies in the past and continues to receive significant subsidies today,” he said.

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You Will Be Watched While You Read This July 28, 2010

Tajfun water cannon on Renault Kerax chassis (...
Image via Wikipedia

Oh, yeah. Because eventually cars will have a communication system that by law will have to be able to communicate with the police. This will be factory-installed in the name of safety. It will amount to this: You’ll pass by a cop’s location, and your car will tell the laptop in his car how fast you’re going.

Don’t think so? Live long enough, you’ll get to enjoy this and much more. Rental car companies are already letting subcontractors spy on you and fine you. Retailers are tagging their crappy clothes so that they can track your movements and spending habits. A respected American aircraft manufacturer, maker of one of the aeronautic icons of WWII, is proud to offer a high-altitude, long-flying spy drone that will undoubtedly spy on Americans. I’ve already written a post about the day when the Earthly landscape itself spies on you using “smart dust.”

I hate all this because I’m getting intensely beleaguered of being observed, tracked, and otherwise spied upon in “the Land of the Free.” I must point out, however, that at times I submit voluntarily to observation either because I simply can’t get around it, or a desired activity results in observation.

Coffee Talk!

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